EHK 744G - 1969 Super

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bks974c
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by bks974c » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:47 am

Comparing left and right sheets, the right looks like the shielding gas was set wrongly. not enough. What gas are you using ?

Trying to run a continuous bead on 1mm does tend to blow through, what's happening is the heats building up as you move forward and it melts away in front of you. The simplest way past this is to run shorter runs and allow to cool slightly between them, simply pausing for a moment and then continuing without lift the nozzle works nicely. For even thinner metal overlapping dots of weld works well and you can turn up the settings without burn through for good penetration.

Good Luck
Scott
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by tiker » Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:07 am

What size wire or you using I find .6 is lot better for thin material
Try just tacking first then tack and move the tip in a half circular motion to extend it then let it cool and start again moving upwards in a different spot to distribute the heat then fill in the spaces between
Regards Gary
Gary
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by Pog » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:08 pm

Ah no, the left sheet was flipped around, so that's the underside which is why they look different. I'm using 0.8mm flux cored wire (gasless), although I did choose a welder which was able to run gas as well if I wanted to go that way. I liked the idea of gasless welding as it's one less thing to think about, and as a beginner I wanted to simplify things. Plus having to constantly replace empty gas bottles sounds annoying!

Ahhh, no wonder I kept blowing through, no matter how much I played with the settings. Lots of short tack welds on the thin stuff, got it. I think I'll still practice on some thicker metal just so I get comfortable with torch positioning.

I knew I could count on you guys for some pointers, I'll give them a try and let you know how I get on.

Pog
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by bks974c » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:25 pm

Pog

Ditch the gasless wire you will never get good welds with it and switch to 0.6 wire.

BOC do a hobby welder deal which is cracking value although they are putting up the prices in Jan.

2020 prices

Rental for year £52
Bottle of gas £40
Collection £6
Plus Vat

Get it before the year end it will cost less and no collection fee, go for the Argoshield Light. For many years I used the universal but definite improvement in weld quality on thin stuff with the light.

It's not a problem returning the bottle after you've finished welding, if you return after 6 months you get 6 months rental back.

Scott
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by Roy Sims » Mon Nov 25, 2019 7:50 am

You could try Adams Gas, you pay a bit more for the gas but no rental, keep the bottle for as long as you like. So if you have to do more welding you have the gas.
Roy
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by bks974c » Mon Nov 25, 2019 9:14 am

The amount of gas in Adams and others without rental is much much less than BOC I did go go down that road at one time, they are ideal if you only weld occasionally bit initially guess you will find plenty to weld.

Scott
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by Pog » Sun Feb 02, 2020 1:41 am

Hi all,

I've not spent as much time on the imp as I'd like, but definitely things are progressing. I jumped at the chance when I saw Jeff Day was doing a batch of rear window frames (especially after a local restoration firm wanted £1500 for the repair of mine!) So that's with him and will come back shiny and restored in due course, very exciting.

I've started making headway on the actual shell. I signed up to the BOC argoshield light hobby offer (thanks Scott), what a difference it's made! The first bit I wanted to tackle was the spare wheel well. I thought there was a rust hole here, but once cleaned revealed solid metal, just bashed a bit.

ImageIMG_20191222_124025 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

So with some persuasion I've managed to get it back to a reasonable shape for the drain hole.

ImageIMG_20191222_132759 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

Next job was at the rear, I noticed the main seam under the rear scuttle was coming apart between the spot welds, I could see light through it which I didn't like at all, so I'm going to be adding stitch welds across key seams to add some strength back into the shell. This was my first attempt at welding on the actual car and I'm pretty pleased with it. Well aware they're not perfect but once some seam sealant is applied it'll do what it's supposed to - I can no longer see any light through the seam so it's definitely pulled it back together.

ImageIMG_20191223_185655 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

I also fabricated and welded on a new tag that was already snapped off.

And now I need your advice. I have a hole in the NSR inside quarter, the only obvious rust I can see:

ImageIMG_20200201_180722 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

For a few weeks I've been building myself up to take an angle grinder to the actual car, thinking I'll simply make a patch for it. But cutting the square out has revealed a whole lot more underneath (as I am fully aware is very common practice with car restoration!). Now I'm freaking out as I feel completely out of my depth. It looks a very complicated panel with a double skin, I don't even recall seeing this panel available as a replacement, only the outer? Is this still a doable job on my own or should I be looking to send the shell off for a professional job? I wouldn't even know where to begin or what needs cutting!

ImageIMG_20200201_182644 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

Pog
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by The Nun » Sun Feb 02, 2020 8:35 am

It's making it very difficult working from inside in that corner to tackle the rust behind the section you have removed, it ideally needs doing from the outside which means removing the outer wing bottom corner up to just below the swage line doing the repair then refitting the outer again using an Express part or if the original outer was still good refit that back again.
Removing the outer wing bottom there can pay dividends too as often the cavity is full of damp soundproofing festering away so that can be removed and all cleaned up whilst doing the job.
It's more time to repair as it's fiddly, this is the problem it's what hidden behind you cant see until you get into it then it can go further than you thought, but it needs doing if its to last properly.
Peter Nunn...ey im member 00033
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by bks974c » Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:08 am

Before you go any further with the inner corner, strip back the paint on the outer rear lower wing and assess the true condition of it, it's a rust sport on the Imp and very unlikely to have escaped but very likely to be full of filler.

If that is the case then as Peter says remove it and you can make the repairs to the inside of the panel, if its perfect simply cut higher up and make a big window in the reinforcement and make the repairs to the inner quarter through that then close up the window afterwards remembering its thicker metal to replicate the original.

Scott
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by Pog » Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:12 pm

Right so here's the state of the rear bottom quarter. You can see where it's been welded before but other than that it doesn't look to bad. I can't fathom why good clean metal was welded over what lies beneath!

ImageIMG_20200202_143509 by Godfrey Hatton, on Flickr

Pog
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by bks974c » Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:24 pm

Pog

Repair looks fairly decent without buying new panels, probably wasn't even aware of the bit you've found.

Consider it the chance to improve you repair skills :lol:

Scott
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Re: EHK 744G - 1969 Super

Post by ImpManiac » Tue Feb 04, 2020 11:48 am

Pog,

Good on you for getting stuck in and starting with the repairs. 8) There are many ways to skin a cat. Or repair bodywork. The fundamental principle is to ensure that you remove all the rust and replace it with good metal in a sound manner. :)

Keep at it!

I have all this to look forward to on my Chamois too! :wink:

IM 8)
Paul Harrison
imp: a small demon : FIEND : a mischievous child : URCHIN
maniac: Raging with disordered intellect: affected with mania: MAD
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