Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Teddie2003 » Mon May 29, 2017 10:24 pm

Weather was a bit mixed at Gurston Down near Salisbury last Saturday. Damp track to start, then it warmed up and started to dry out but got windier. Best start and time for Eric was on the third practice run of the day, tremendous start of 2.15 seconds for the 1st 64 feet, 2 seconds mean you pull 1 g on acceleration.

Eric in his Mod Prod Imp in the up to 1400cc class, had these times for third practice.
No. Name Vehicle
58 Eric MORREY Hillman Imp 2.15 64ft time 90.8mph speed at Hollow 95.2mph finish speed 35.91 finish time

There were 140 cars entered at Gurston and on the third runs only these four has quicker 64 foot times than Eric off the start line
63 G TWEMLOW Subaru Impreza 2.12 64ft time 94.6mph speed at Hollow 94.1mph finish speed 36.59 finish time
33 J WILLIAMSON Porsche 911 Carrera 1.96 64ft time 89.5mph speed at Hollow 90.6mph finish speed 36.73 finish time
121 J CHACKSFIELD OMS 28 2.14 64ft time 115.2mph speed at Hollow 92.9mph finish speed 30.83 finish time
84 A McDONALD Mini Evo 2.06 64ft time 102.4mph speed at Hollow 109.0mph finish speed 32.68 finish time

The Mini Evo is a sports Libre that runs with 4WD Mitsubishi Evo running gear and the EVO engine with well over twice as much power as Eric runs.
The Porsche has been developed over 20 plus years and is one of the quickest Porsche’s on the south west hills.
I’m sure the commentator announced that the Subaru has a new engine this year with about 400BHP and the OMS single seater is a supercharged Hyabusa with similar power and an aero package that’s a little bit more refined than even Eric’s Imp can achieve.

On the third practice run Eric was quicker over 64 feet than all the single seater contenders in the British Hillclimb Championship, but they were just a bit quicker on the speeds through hollow and the finish line. These were the top five single seater times.
2 Trevor WILLIS OMS 28 2.19 64ft time 130.4mph speed at Hollow 140.0mph finish speed 27.23 finish time
1 Scott MORAN Gould GR61X 2.31 64ft time 135.1mph speed at Hollow 140.0mph finish speed 27.26 finish time
6 Will HALL Force WH-XTEC 2.17 64ft time 140.9mph speed at Hollow 150.3mph finish speed 27.55 finish time
10 Jason MOURANT Gould GR55 2.42 64ft time 133.4mph speed at Hollow 143.3mph finish speed 27.63 finish time
3 Wallace MENZIES Gould GR59b 2.29 64ft time 149.1mph speed at Hollow 140.2mph finish speed 27.79 finish time

On the Sunday’s first top 12 run off the single seaters got even quicker with a fastest time of 26.22 for Trevor Willis and for Wallace Menzies 151mph through hollow and 158mph across the finish line

For those of you who have never seen the BHC cars, the top cars are specialist hillclimb single seaters and run assorted types of engines with anything up to 650 BHP. Gurston is only 12 feet wide in some places, Hollow is at the bottom of the hill before they take the fast left and so 158mph across the finish line on that width of road and going uphill needs a lot of concentration.
This shows what Gurston is like:

So once Eric can get the aero sorted on the front of the Imp and the extra 50mph through Hollow and 55mph across the finish line, just imagine how quick an Imp will go up Gurston! Seriously though, it’s a cracking car that’s really well presented and a great credit to Eric and everyone who has helped with the build.

There are another 12 BHC 2017 events at venues all around the country including 2 in the Channel Islands and 2 in Scotland, don’t know how many venues Eric will be visiting, but I’m sure he will be happy to see people on his travels.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Tue May 30, 2017 6:38 am

FAB.

And sounds like reliability is properly sorted too.

Transaxle mods (and driveshafts) must be holding-up well given the 64ft times!

I must get out more ..Clan needs MOT (collapsed outer steering column cage) haven't driven it for over a year now! Clan004
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by skamanfrank » Tue May 30, 2017 9:06 am

Nice to see you again at the weekend Eric, the car looked great as ever. As mentioned previously the 64ft times are rather awesome- certainly puts it into context comparing them to the single seaters.
We were playing a game of leap frog on the dual carriageway on the way back too!

We have a good first round- P7 in the run off, but Oliver has had a couple of big crashes in the wet in the past so the second round qualifying run was more of a trundle up the hill and unfortunately we didn't qualify. Sandra did well on Sunday morning too getting up the hill in 29 secs.

Are you heading to Loton Park?
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ImpManiac » Fri Jun 02, 2017 3:08 pm

I want to get to some of these events. I shall take a look at the calendar.

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:58 pm

Update Time again.
After my fun time at Gurston that Steve kindly talked about above I have done a few more events.
The car has run faultlessly, with time between events spent doing little improvements instead of repairs.
In June I competed at Loton Park, a lovely twisty hill near Shrewsbury. Saturday practice and Sunday competitive runs. Saturday was fun with Brad Drowne in his Citroen AX pushing me really hard for top position in the 4 strong class. On the Sunday timed runs I managed to beat Brad by 3 tenths of a second in the first run, then on the second run I managed to spin the car., within its own length, at the top of the ‘straight’, but still managed to stop the car on the tarmac. Brad pulled out all the stops with a run which was quicker than me all the way up the hill, and won the class with a brilliant drive.

After Loton I was supposed to do an event at Barbon Manor in Cumbria on the Saturday and an event at Harewood in Yorkshire on the Sunday. Unfortunately the event at Barbon was cancelled on the Thursday because the grass paddock was flooded and not much chance of it drying out by the weekend.

So Off to Harewood again for a 1 day meeting, again though a small turnout for the class with just me and Roy Bolderson in his Mini. A nice, if cold day, staying dry and a great days motorsport.
I beat Roy and won the class, as well as lowering the class record, which I set in May, by nearly a second . This was on the first timed run, on the second I was 1.5 seconds slower, for no real reason. Car felt fine, but all my splits were slower and I just wasn’t ‘on it’. Anyway, a new personal best is great.

July was very quiet, with no events to go to, and no real fettling to do to the car. So I did other things, like holidays and other stuff, and fettling the road Clan.

August arrived and I went down to the IMP National With PIMP2 on the trailer, after setting up camp with the Leicester/Cornwall guys, it was time to catch up with all the great IMP friends, all within easy reach (usually near the bar).
On Sunday I actually wiped the car down and give the car a bit of a clean. Along with all sorts of micky taking, by the nearby ‘helpful’ team.
Stuck the car into the Line Up on Sunday in the Competition Class and was very pleased to be voted top car in the class, and have to line up in front with all the other top cars. Whilst the deliberations were going on I nipped off to Mark Maynards to buy a couple of gaskets I forgot to get earlier. As I returned I was surprised to hear that Pimp2 had been voted Top Car and presented with the beautiful Perpetual Trophy. I didn’t expect that, and thanks to all the people that voted for it. As a real ‘Peoples Award’ I really am grateful. I’ve tried to build the fasted Imp I can within the rules of the sport, but also tried to make it look good as well – makes it all feel worthwhile.

Anyway back to going fast.

After the Harewood meeting, a friend sent me a picture of the car under braking after going thro’ the farmhouse section, and the spoiler was almost touching the ground and the front wheels had about 5 degrees of negative camber. So the brakes work well, but the front springs could probably do with being a bit stiffer. I measured the old springs and worked out they were 250lbs ish, so I bought some 300 lb 8inch long ones and fitted them.

Also just before Harewood, I added Launch Control to help make the starts more consistent. With the turbo it is very hard to hold a steady start revs and also the turbo isn’t ‘spooled up’ when starting. What Launch Control does is add a lower rev limiter when the clutch is depressed, which allows me to hold quarter throttle, whilst the engine is held at 7300 rpm (popping and banking), this allows the turbo to spool up to 11 PSI, drop the clutch and off we go.

On Sunday I competed at Shelsley Walsh at the BHC 70th anniversary weekend. I had entered both Saturday & Sundays events but only got an entry on Sunday due to both days being very oversubscribed. A glorious day, with most of the British Hillclimb champions present, doing a parade at lunchtime, some in their winning cars.

My normal class was merged with the upto 2 litre class, so I ended up against , Andrew Russell in his Ginetta G15 (only 1040cc at the moment as his 1120 let a lot of bits escape a few months ago), a double drive Lotus Elise and a Lotus Exige. So the only tin top in the class. Practice went well, with my first run up the hill under my best time set in the car last year. Ist timed run was okay but a car had left most of its gearbox oil on its way up the hill and the cement dust was rather off putting, so I took it a bit carefully. Second timed run and lets go for it, I got a brilliant start (2.14 secs) and carried extra speed through the first corner, which meant at the second corner I arrived too fast for third gear. So I stuck it in 4th gear and lifted slightly and the car just flew round the corner, back on the power early and carry the speed up to the esses. I manged to stop the car and do a good line through the esses , and then power out to the finish. Crossing the line you have to brake very hard to park at the top of the hill, and they have conveniently fitted a time display as you enter the top paddock. A look across and It said 32.67 secs, a second faster than I had ever been up the hill. It felt like an absolutely perfect run and was really pleased with the result. The Exige improved as well and beat me to second place by 0.09 secs. When I went to the timing screens, once I got back to the main paddock, I found out that I had broken the class record – result.

Shelsley Walsh is one of the most famous UK Hillclimbs, and to now be the holder of the class record for Mod Prod cars upto 1400cc cars, (displacing a mini) really feels good. Especially as it is in a Imp.

Shelsley Results

Class C1 and C2 (merged) Modified Series Production Cars up to 2000cc
Record C1 Tim Dennis Mini Cooper 1380cc. 32.76 secs. 4 5 2014

47 Paul Jones Lotus Exige 1900 2005 32.58
45 Eric Morrey Hillman Imp 998T 1968 32.67
8 Eynon Price Lotus Elise 1800 2015 34.39
48 Andrew Russell Ginetta G15 1040 1971 34.87
46 Tony Adams Lotus Elise 1800 2002 35.43
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Impecunious » Mon Aug 14, 2017 10:27 pm

Great post Eric - many congratulations.

Don't forget it's your round next time... :lol:

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ImpManiac » Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:58 am

Congratulations, Eric! :mrgreen: That is a great write-up - one for Impressions, I would say. :wink:

I was really pleased to see you take your awards at national. They were well deserved, in my humble opinion. The car is obviously far from stock but it is still definitely Imp through and through, is beautifully built and prepared and is putting the competition in its rightful place on the hillclimbs of the UK right now too. Enough said! 8)

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by 617sqn » Tue Aug 15, 2017 10:50 am

/\+1 What he said ! 8)

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lars Hagermark » Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:11 am

I'm one more to salute you Eric and your car.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by chris d » Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:59 am

as above
me as well
awesome car and build
well done
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Wed Aug 16, 2017 8:24 pm

Thanks for the comments guys, I'm over the moon how the car is going.
Anyway, i've been pointed at a couple of video's on youtube featuring the car at Prescott at the start of the year.
The second one shows the whole C1 class including Andy Russell in his 1140cc Ginetta G15.

https://youtu.be/pW9_Dz1vSCM & https://youtu.be/s68IqEblYQQ

I'll be there for the first weekend in September, great venue to spectate at.

Eric
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ImpManiac » Wed Aug 16, 2017 8:57 pm

Great videos, Eric. Your car sounds wonderful and is rather quick! :D

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:57 pm

A couple of more events have gone by, it should of been 3 but some idiot forgot (until too late) to put his entry into the August Bank Holiday event at Gurston Down. I didn't get an entry, wich was really anooying because I could have got maximum championship points if I had driven well, as there were enough cars there and I beat them all last time I was there.

The first event was a non-championship event at Curborough, the Scimitar club one I used to be Secretary for. Nice relaxed event with no single seaters, 15 or so Scimitars and Sabres, 20 ish Ferraris, and a great selection of Classic sportscars. I was in a class for Mod prod cars with only a TR7 fitted with a Rover Vitesse spec V8 for company, so we had about the same power :twisted: 4 good runs getting quicker all the time saw me win the class, and being 4th fastest car overall, beating all the Ferrraris.

As I had a free Bank Holiday :oops: , I tried one more thing to try and reduce the high inlet temps I have been experiencing. As mentioned before I run a water cooled Intercooler and at the end of the runs I have been getting 60+ degree C inlet temps. Not dangerously high but I would like lower. I've tried bigger radiators and more water in the system without really affecting the temps much. So only really two components left, the intercooler and the pump. The whole turbo installation is designed around the intercooler and is very difficult (and expensive) to change. So the pump is next.

The electric pump i'm usuing is an auxilary water pump off a Ford Galaxy which I got secondhand. It is probably the least powerful on the market. My next theory is that if the flow is not enough then the water can't take the heat away from the air quick enough to hold the temps down. A bigger pump should move the water around mutch quicker so should help. A few hours research on the Internet found me a much more powerful one fitted to Range Rovers and Mercedes, and with the same size water inlets should be easy to fit. £100 later a brand new one arrived and I set about fitting it. A new bracket to hang the, twice the size, pump off the side of the engine was made and the pump fitted.

The water system has a small 0.5 liter swirl pot fitted at the highest point, well, once I had filled the system and got the pump wired in, this spat water out everywhere. The flow was that strong that the suction from the pump lowered the water level 40mm and the return water swirled out the top and made a right mess. I had to take the swirl pot off and hammer the inlet pipe to point downwards a bit to keep the water in. Once refiitted it kept the water in with the lid off, but I have to keep the water level down as when the pump stops the levels rises up that 40 mm it gets sucked down. I think I now have enough flow now.

Next event was back to Prescott where I had my first meeting of the year. Very similar turn out of cars. On the Saturday,in practice, I was swopping places with Brad in his Ctroen AX again, both of us ahead of the rest. The beautifull sunny weather of the saturday turned into a wet and miserable Sunday.Our first runs were on a damp track and was very slippery and I ended up 3rd , but it was only practice, but not much help for the later runs as the rain just carried on.

The timed runs were both on a soaking wet track. Brad was running in front of me and when the red flags came out 10 secs after he had left the line I knew he had lost on the first corner, so after a 5 minute delay to remove the mud off the track, it was my go. I took it carefully around the first bent but found the grip pretty good so I attacked the track anf set a time good enough for first in class. On the second timed run it was still pretty wet, but I gave my best shot and was rewarded with fastest in class and nearly 2 seconds faster than my first run.

I was really pleased with that as in the wet the power is not so important and high boost turbo cars aren't the easiest to drive in the wet. It Just shows how good the basic imp suspenion is (modified a bit).
Also the water temps were definately better, with a peak of only 50 degrees, albeit in cooler temps, but going the right way.

Anyway I'm off to Doune nr Stirling in Scotland this coming weekend, so if anybody up there fancies popping along be sure to search me out.

Cheers

Eric
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by bks974c » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:24 pm

Eric

Ahead of you, I've invited other area centre members to join me and my brother who are definitely coming along on Sunday. it would be good to see
the Imps parked up together. Will see how many reply.

Have a safe journey, and hope Saturday qualifying goes well. See you Sunday.

I've pm'd you my number incase to find you need something when you get there.

Scott
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:46 pm

So glad you are doing well Eric. I'd like to believe that you'd be even quicker in the Clan but no doubt you've got the imp to be even faster than the old set-up by now.

Water might not be the best coolant against fast-moving hot air because it picks-up heat slowly - yes it holds a lot of heat but it absorbs it slowly and let goes of it slowly too. so increasing the water flow rate will have a limited effect.

You probably know what i'm gonna say next!

Evan waterless coolant picks up heat faster than water but has less heat capacity. It also releases it's heat faster than water so higher pump flow rates are needed. Unless Evans is banned from use in your event then it's worth considering. You might be able to tune the flow rate and radiator size to your advantage? Clan004
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ylee coyote » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:59 pm

Charge cooler temperatures are all about heat transfer ,coolant flow will help (bigger pump) or losing more heat from the radiator ,so size of radiator ,airflow through the radiator ,should make a difference ( I have seen ice boxes ...) As for the coolant to use ? water has the best heat transfer ,ethylene glycol mixes are less ,Evans coolant are about the same as a 50/50 ethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol (the safe stuff ) has the lowest heat transfer properties.
I ran my 500 hp turbo car with a 20% ethylene glycol mix with best results
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ylee coyote » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:06 pm

From Hot rod forum ....

Wrenchin' @ Random

The specific heat capacity of ethylene glycol–based water solutions is less than that of pure water; in a 50 percent solution, ethylene glycol’s specific heat capacity compared with pure water is decreased at least 20 percent at 36 degrees and about 17 percent at 200 degrees. Propylene glycol, another common coolant, has an even lower specific heat. Assuming a 100-gpm (gallons/minute) coolant flow rate and an energy loss through the coolant system of 189.5 hp, the water temperature increase would be 10 degrees, the ethylene glycol water mix would gain 20 degrees, and propylene glycol would gain 33.3 degrees.

Compensating for the reduced heat capacity of coolant/water mixes would require circulating more fluid through the system. Assuming a fixed amount of circulating fluid and radiator capacity, running 100 percent water would be the most efficient coolant in terms of its ability to conduct heat with minimal temperature rise. In other words, of all common liquids, water requires the most heat energy to change its temperature.

However, there are also differences in the vapor point of the three different coolants. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol have higher vapor points and therefore can absorb heat at higher temperatures without boiling. Yet even with its lower vapor point, water still carries more heat per unit.

Don’t forget that the coolant is just one part of the total cooling-system “team.” You can raise water’s effective vapor point by using a higher-pressure radiator cap. For every pound of increased system pressure, water’s boiling point goes up by 3 degrees. Higher boiling points also reduce evaporation losses, water-pump cavitation, and heat-soak–induced after-boil. You can get away with a higher system pressure by using a quality aluminum radiator that’s rated for higher pressure than is a brass/copper radiator. Aluminum radiators can take more pressure because their tensile strength is greater than brass—this lets an aluminum unit use tubes with larger cross sections an thinner walls. A larger tube also has more wall-surface area, resulting in improved heat transfer.

Bottom line: A large-tube aluminum radiator filled with pure water and using at least a 20-psi cap is by far the best heat-transfer setup, provided the vehicle is not subject to freezing conditions. Be sure to add a corrosion inhibitor when running pure water.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:54 pm

Ylee. I've read that sort of stuff before. It is more about panicking about coolant RUNNING temperature (the temperature reading on the gauge) rather than the DYNAMICS of heat transfer...and misses the point I was try to make. I run Evans in the Clan and the Lotus - both have an EWP of which I can control the flow-rate from the cabin and so I have first-hand knowledge in real-world driving that Evans indeed needs a faster coolant flow rate than water to transfer heat effectively.

To enable me to get an objective view on the difference between water and Evans as a coolant I performed a basic (but controlled) experiment on the bench to show that Evans heats faster than water for EXACTLY the same heat input (See results of my simple experiment here). The reason the water temp is slow to rise (in the car and the experiment) is because water is a better heat BUFFER than Evans. But being a better buffer of heat (high specific heat) has its down side. Yes water heats more slowly than Evans but it cools more slowly too as I proved in the cool-down phase of the experiment! Yes water holds more heat than Evans per unit volume, but Evans lets it's heat go more readily than water. Water is a great heat buffer ..but that very property limits both the RATE of heat gain AND the RATE of heat loss. ..which can be a curse ..or an advantage ..you just have to design the cooling system specifically to harness the different properties of Evans ..a system designed for water won't work so well with Evans which is what the world and his wife keep complaining about without considering the fuller picture.

So the point I'm making is if the air is too hot at high power (lots of inlet air flow/consumption) then you need either a bigger intercooler radiator, or QUICKER heat removal from the intercooler to cool the FAST-MOVING air efficiently.. As explained above, water is definitely SLOW to pickup heat compared to Evans - I've proved that to myself at least. So for a given radiator(intercooler) size with water as a coolant you reach the ceiling of heat transfer at faster water flow rates. You can flow Evans faster than water and still pick-up useful heat but then you have to dump that heat quickly into the main radiator...Evans won't HOLD the heat as well as water so you have to get it to the main radiator as soon as possible or it loses heat into everything it touches ..including the oil...which is a problem for a road car ..but not usually an issue for a hillclimb car on a 2 minute sprint!

OK you can solve the problem with the current water system by fitting a bigger intercooler ....and add more weight :( ..or try to cool the intercooler faster with Evans at a high flow rate :) ...and use more AMPS :( ..no such thing as a free lunch I guess. :lol:

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by bks974c » Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:27 am

With the hillclimbs being say 60 second of applied power it allows some radical different approaches to intercooler cooling.

My initial thought was water spray but not going to go down well with the organisers and fellow competitors when it gets on the track, then a quick evaporating chemical/liquid but as most of them tend to be flammable that not very smart. CO2 might work but might start getting expensive so how about compressed air.

You need a suitable storage vessel something like a fire extinguisher or a plumbed in fire system would be very suitable including using their spray nozzles to deliver the air. At the hillclimb you would need a mobile compressor to recharge the vessel and some way of cooling it ideally- cool boxes or even using the tow cars air conditioning system could work. Tie it all into the megasquirt so it prechills the intercooler under launch control and through out the run. No ideal how large a vessel you would need as that as depends how much air flow you need to cool it by x degrees and size might be the limiting factor. Food for thought ?

Adds weight but down sizing the water to air systems could offset that possibly even doing away with it totally if it worked even if only for the duration of the run.

Scott
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:31 am

bks974c wrote:With the hillclimbs being say 60 second of applied power it allows some radical different approaches to intercooler cooling.

My initial thought was water spray but not going down with the organisers and fellow competitors when it gets on the track, then a quick evaporating
chemical/liquid but as most of them tend to be flammable that not very smart. CO2 might work but might start getting expensive so how about compressed air.

You need a suitable storage vessel something like a fire extinguisher or a plumbed in fire system would be very suitable including using their spray nozzles to deliver the air. At the hillclimb you would need a mobile compressor to recharge the vessel and some way of cooling it ideally- cool boxes or even using the tow cars air conditioning system could work. Tie it all into the megasquirt so it prechills the intercooler under launch control and through out the run. No ideal how large a vessel you would need as that as depends how much air flow you need to cool it by x degrees and size might be the limiting factor. Food for thought ?

Adds weight but down sizing the water to air systems could offset that possibly even doing away with it totally if it worked even if only for the duration of the run.

Scott
That's what I like! Someone who is prepared to think intelligently out of the box and try something different! :)

Nice one Scott.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by skamanfrank » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:07 am

pimpdriver wrote:A couple of more events have gone by, it should of been 3 but some idiot forgot (until too late) to put his entry into the August Bank Holiday event at Gurston Down.
I did wonder where you were!
Cheers
Frank
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:19 pm

Interesting discussion on the cooling. I looked at ice and all the other things and decided it was too much faf. Theses things are great until you have to wait on the line for 20 mins after a big off, have to have an imediate re-run etc. So unless it happens automatically then I won't bother with it. I have enough trouble remembering to start the datalogging before each run :oops:
The evans coolant is not a bad idea, but the amount of water I through around the back yard whi;st getting the pump fitted and bled would have cost a bomb with the evans stuff. I have to take the engine out every 5 events to adjust the clutch, god knows how much coolant i would waste doing that.
Keep the ideas coming.

Eric
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:30 pm

Yes I have to agree that Evans is far too expensive. A lot more people (including the naysayers) would try it out and properly adapt their system IF it were reasonably priced ..in fact my local Evans Agent said the main barrier to widespread use (and making a profit) IS its cost and not so much its function. Evans is reusable once drained - you just have to make sure you catch it all! A bit of creative thinking with the drainage system (large taps in the right places) and you can recover 99.9 % of the stuff to reinstall.

I've changed the rad on the Lotus (a cheap Chinese Aluminium rad FAILED- so went back to brass and copper! :evil: ) and reused the Evans - once refilled with recovered Evans I needed to top-up about 20 mm of coolant within the small header tank (about 100ml or less) .

My only major disaster was in the development phase when I forgot to tighten the output hose on the Clan's EWP80 - lost 3 or 4 litres all over the engine bay (plus exhaust manifold!) and up the road. I didn't have any spare Evans Powercool at the time so I got home by adding a minimal amount of Evans PREP fluid rather than contaminating the system with water - which worked out OK (you can run the engine on 100% Prep fluid for a limited period).

Needless to say, both Lotus and Clan are properly coolant-tight at the moment - Lotus is fully silicone hosed - Clan is still on old rubber in the main :oops: .

Other benefits include NO system pressure (or corrosion) - so it's very forgiving when using MS wills rings and dodgy outer water gaskets. And when the failed Chinese rad leaked it only lost a dribble of coolant when the rad was cold - .when hot the loss wasn't apparent (alum expansion) and having ZERO system pressure helped here.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ylee coyote » Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:03 pm

Evans coolant ,
Here is the best article I could find ....
Here is the theory with Evans (or any coolant for that matter)

First of all, discard everything you think you know about coolant temperatures. Coolant is the bucket in which heat gets carried away from the engine and dissipated in the radiator. The actual temperature of the coolant is only a factor in situations where the coolant boils. What happens with traditional EG and water is that it can boil at lower temperatures than straight coolant. People experience nucleate boiling at 230 degrees of indicated temperature, they blow a head gasket and get a warped head. From there on out, it is forever legend that and proof that 230 degrees can warp heads. This is far from the truth.

What happens is that the coolant mixture might be averaging 230 degrees at the sensor, but above the chambers it is beginning to boil. Everywhere its boiling, it doesn't have contact with water... which makes things hotter... which makes more boiling... which makes less contact. Then of course you have areas of extreme heat and areas that are still in contact with water. That is what causes the warping and head gasket failure.

The thought behind NPG is that when you remove the water, you remove the possibility of that nucleate boiling. At that point, the actual temperature of the coolant has very little to do with how effectively it transports heat. We're programmed to think that 220 degrees is too hot, but its only too hot because of the water in the coolant.

As long as heat out = heat in, the temperature will remain constant at or near thermostat temp.

One of the downfalls of NPG coolant is that it is not only less capable of carrying heat, it is slower to absorb and shed it. Its specific heat capacity is less than that of water, so depending on your vehicle, you may need increased airflow or a more efficient radiator to make sure that heat out is greater than heat in.

However, one of the points to NPG is that you can temporarily have greater heat in than heat out (increase in temperature) without much consequence. As long as your oil temps stay in check, (250 or less for conventional, 280-300 for synthetic), let the temperature rise. 300+ was a common thing to see in my Caddy 500 with Evans NPG on a long hill climb while towing.

Benefits: No pressure cap, so it has a greatly reduced chance of leaks or blown hoses. Increased lubricity for water pump. obvious benefits to rust reduction in the iron castings. No boiling. Hotter engines also tend to be healthier. Its so programmed into us to keep engines cool. We run cooler stats. The thing is, engines like to be hot (within reason of course). Without nucleate boiling, there are is less chance of detonation. That might be a nice benefit in a boosted application. When your car overheats and starts detonating, its not because 230 degrees is too hot. Those flame fronts are seeing 2000 degrees F. 10 more degrees of coolant temp isn't what is causing the detonation, its because the chambers have boiling coolant on the jacket. Its not the temperature of the chamber or the coolant, its because the timing advance is tuned assuming that the chambers and coolant are adequately moving heat away from combustion. When you get boiling, it can't pull that energy away and you get detonation. Put it this way... if you get detonation at 230 degrees with 50/50, that does not mean you'll get detonation with NPG at 230 degrees. The point is, without water to boil, Evans maintains constant contact and heat transfer regardless of its temperature

Drawbacks: When not running a pressure cap, you can experience a constant sweet smell of coolant. Without water, there is reduced heat capacity in the coolant so it may require increased efficiency elsewhere. Its expensive stuff.

It does have the nice benefit of not requiring an anti-cavitation additive in diesel applications. Diesel engines also tend to be much more thermally stable - larger capacity for coolant and oil, larger radiators, much more cast iron, etc. That is one of the reasons why its targeted at fleet applications. As you can imagine, a 3000-lb Detroit engine assembly that holds 19 gallons of coolant means that temperature rises would be gradual, but imagine a 1.5L aluminum 4-banger with a coolant capacity of 2 gallons. Temperature changes can be much more abrupt in the smaller engine.

As long as you understand that heat and temperature are linked but not equal, it makes sense. I liked Evans in my Caddy 500, but it wasn't really a big benefit. I can imagine it would be great in larger applications, but not a benefit in smaller applications.

You originally said, "So on one hand, it's got a much higher boiling point so there will be less chance of hot spots. But on the other, it apparently has 30% worse heat transfer than water, so while I may not be boiling it, it may not be cooling enough either..."

As long as its not boiling, and as long as it is not increasing temperature, it is cooling adequately. It doesn't really matter if its 180 degrees or 280. As long as you keep oil temps in check, it should be fine.



So for a small turbo engine the "anti nucleation" is a real boon where cylinder temperatures and hot spots can be an issue
For a chargecooler application it would be a waste of money ,the higher heat capacity and the better heat conduction of water would be the way to go ,the only downside is the high surface tension where you want to avoid any air pockets ,My choice would be a weak ethylene glycol solution (around 20 %) and a water wetter product to help the heat transfer, I would run Evans in the engine with a high capacity water pump
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:09 am

ylee coyote wrote:Evans coolant ,
Here is the best article I could find ....
Here is the theory with Evans (or any coolant for that matter)

First of all, discard everything you think you know about coolant temperatures. Coolant is the bucket in which heat gets carried away from the engine and dissipated in the radiator. The actual temperature of the coolant is only a factor in situations where the coolant boils. What happens with traditional EG and water is that it can boil at lower temperatures than straight coolant. People experience nucleate boiling at 230 degrees of indicated temperature, they blow a head gasket and get a warped head. From there on out, it is forever legend that and proof that 230 degrees can warp heads. This is far from the truth.

What happens is that the coolant mixture might be averaging 230 degrees at the sensor, but above the chambers it is beginning to boil. Everywhere its boiling, it doesn't have contact with water... which makes things hotter... which makes more boiling... which makes less contact. Then of course you have areas of extreme heat and areas that are still in contact with water. That is what causes the warping and head gasket failure.

The thought behind NPG is that when you remove the water, you remove the possibility of that nucleate boiling. At that point, the actual temperature of the coolant has very little to do with how effectively it transports heat. We're programmed to think that 220 degrees is too hot, but its only too hot because of the water in the coolant.

As long as heat out = heat in, the temperature will remain constant at or near thermostat temp.

One of the downfalls of NPG coolant is that it is not only less capable of carrying heat, it is slower to absorb and shed it. Its specific heat capacity is less than that of water, so depending on your vehicle, you may need increased airflow or a more efficient radiator to make sure that heat out is greater than heat in.

However, one of the points to NPG is that you can temporarily have greater heat in than heat out (increase in temperature) without much consequence. As long as your oil temps stay in check, (250 or less for conventional, 280-300 for synthetic), let the temperature rise. 300+ was a common thing to see in my Caddy 500 with Evans NPG on a long hill climb while towing.

Benefits: No pressure cap, so it has a greatly reduced chance of leaks or blown hoses. Increased lubricity for water pump. obvious benefits to rust reduction in the iron castings. No boiling. Hotter engines also tend to be healthier. Its so programmed into us to keep engines cool. We run cooler stats. The thing is, engines like to be hot (within reason of course). Without nucleate boiling, there are is less chance of detonation. That might be a nice benefit in a boosted application. When your car overheats and starts detonating, its not because 230 degrees is too hot. Those flame fronts are seeing 2000 degrees F. 10 more degrees of coolant temp isn't what is causing the detonation, its because the chambers have boiling coolant on the jacket. Its not the temperature of the chamber or the coolant, its because the timing advance is tuned assuming that the chambers and coolant are adequately moving heat away from combustion. When you get boiling, it can't pull that energy away and you get detonation. Put it this way... if you get detonation at 230 degrees with 50/50, that does not mean you'll get detonation with NPG at 230 degrees. The point is, without water to boil, Evans maintains constant contact and heat transfer regardless of its temperature

Drawbacks: When not running a pressure cap, you can experience a constant sweet smell of coolant. Without water, there is reduced heat capacity in the coolant so it may require increased efficiency elsewhere. Its expensive stuff.

It does have the nice benefit of not requiring an anti-cavitation additive in diesel applications. Diesel engines also tend to be much more thermally stable - larger capacity for coolant and oil, larger radiators, much more cast iron, etc. That is one of the reasons why its targeted at fleet applications. As you can imagine, a 3000-lb Detroit engine assembly that holds 19 gallons of coolant means that temperature rises would be gradual, but imagine a 1.5L aluminum 4-banger with a coolant capacity of 2 gallons. Temperature changes can be much more abrupt in the smaller engine.

As long as you understand that heat and temperature are linked but not equal, it makes sense. I liked Evans in my Caddy 500, but it wasn't really a big benefit. I can imagine it would be great in larger applications, but not a benefit in smaller applications.

You originally said, "So on one hand, it's got a much higher boiling point so there will be less chance of hot spots. But on the other, it apparently has 30% worse heat transfer than water, so while I may not be boiling it, it may not be cooling enough either..."

As long as its not boiling, and as long as it is not increasing temperature, it is cooling adequately. It doesn't really matter if its 180 degrees or 280. As long as you keep oil temps in check, it should be fine.



So for a small turbo engine the "anti nucleation" is a real boon where cylinder temperatures and hot spots can be an issue
For a chargecooler application it would be a waste of money ,the higher heat capacity and the better heat conduction of water would be the way to go ,the only downside is the high surface tension where you want to avoid any air pockets ,My choice would be a weak ethylene glycol solution (around 20 %) and a water wetter product to help the heat transfer, I would run Evans in the engine with a high capacity water pump
I agree with everything in that article EXCEPT the statement in RED.

Evans will absorb exactly the same heat energy input as water over the same time period but the terminal TEMPERATURE READING after absorbing the same amount of heat will READ higher than water, - which agrees with his statement in BLUE. It seems to me that his opening statement of FACT in BLUE contradicts his later underlined ASSUMPTION in red about what specific heat actually means in practice.

Moreover to this end, my simple bench experiment showed that the rate of TEMPERATURE READING LOSS (which equates to the RATE of heat ENERGY loss from the coolant or the AMOUNT of HEAT ENERGY loss over TIME) is at a faster rate than water as shown by the steeper drop in the curve over time than water - and by the MUCH greater area under the curve for Evans than water. (See results of my simple experiment here). This is because, a) there is a greater temperature difference between the two transfer mediums (ambient air and the coolant) and, b) EVANs is a worse heat buffer than water ..ie it has a lower specific heat than water.

It's all very well comparing, in theory, the different specific heat values but one needs to see how it works in PRACTICE. The fact is, EVANS loses heat faster between a transfer medium (with a temperature differential) than water, not only because it has a lower specific heat than water, but because it is also a better CONDUCTOR of heat than water.

I have proved, to myself at least, that in practice if you increase the flow rate of EVANs it will dump useful heat into the transfer medium whereas water hits a ceiling of heat transfer when it flows faster through the transfer medium because water is a poorer CONDUCTOR of heat than Evans. Think about the usefulness of the properties of specific heat and conductance. As an extreme example, for exactly the same heat energy input, aluminium has a tiny specific heat value but is a massively better conductor of heat than water. ie water has better heat BUFFERING properties because it is more difficult to vibrate a water molecule than that of aluminium. Similarly it is easier to vibrate Evans molecules than those of water hence EVANs shows a higher temperature reading than water for exactly the same heat energy input over time.

The only way to prove that Evans will reduce air temperature better than water in the same sized intercooler IF you are allowed to optimise (vary) the flow of coolant, ...is to try it. I don't have the means or motivation to try it atm but I do have a SMART turbo with an intercooler which is tempting, but unfortunately it's my wife's car and she would be upset with me if I messed with it!

Theory is food for thought only - practice, plus objective assessment, provides the proof.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:02 pm

End Of Season round up time.
I have completed three more events to finish my season off.
Doune
What can I say – what a hill, fast, scary, fun about covers it. My first trek to this Scottish venue, about 10 miles to the west of Stirling. I arrived after a 6.5 hr drive on the Friday, set up my tent and went for a walk up the hill. It took me about 25minutes to walk the hill, and looking at the times people do, it’s a very fast hill.
Come the Saturday, the first timers there got a run up the hill being driven in a Mondeo to see the course, very well done and a nice touch.
There were only two of us in the class, a mini prepared by the ex Imp driver Graeme Wight Jnr and driven by Jim Sugden.First practice run was more of a sighting run but was a reasonable time. My second practice was red flagged after the first bend as the car in front had gone off. This was an advantage for me as it was a slightly damp track due to a small light rain shower. By the time I had my re-run the track had dried. On my third practice run I tried the first corner in third and this felt much better.
On Sunday we had a practice run first which went very well with me knocking a large chunk of time off by staying in fourth gear for most of the lower section.
On my first timed run I went for it and took East Brae, the corner after the 1 in 3 bit in third this time and it went perfectly and I managed to get my time down to 50.26 secs, which was under the 17 year old record stated at 50.52. Unfortunately the entry list was wrong, I found out, once I had returned to the paddock, the record was actually 50.26 secs. bother, I had equalled it. On my last run I manged to slow just a little too much for East Brae and the car just dropped off cam for a second as it pulled out from it and I recorded time of 50.27, just outside the record. I was ¼ second up before East Brae so a bit disappointed with the last run.
But hey, I equalled the record on my fourth ever run up the hill, can’t be too upset. I won the class (of 2) and nice touch was at the prize giving I was presented with the Speakman Trophy for the Scrutineers choice of best presented car. This is especially rewarding having looked at the previous winners are all proper racing cars, not a home build modified production car like mine.
I’ll be back to Doune next year, for sure.
Loton Park
This was the last round of the Leaders Championship. At one stage I was lying second overall, but had gradually slipped back to 9th after Gurston Down, the event I missed. After Doune I gained points but not full points as there was only two of us in the class, but went up to 6th. With a large entry of 6 cars at Loton Park there was a chance of gaining places as I could get full points with a win.
The whole track at Loton had recently been resurfaced and was in in perfect nick. I had great competition with Brad Drowne again in his Citroen AX. During practice, I beat him in the first run up the hill, he beat me in the second, and I spun the car in the third, at my usual place at the top of Cedar Straight.
The resurfaced start line was giving great starts, and now I’m used to using the launch control, I was expecting good starts. In second practice I managed a superb start, recording a 2 second dead o-64 foot time, and in third practice went even better and did a 1.97 second start. My first ever sub 2 second start, which is almost unknown among 2 wheel drive saloon cars.
On the Sunday, we just had the two timed runs. On my first I was a bit of a wuss at the end of the Cedar Straight and backed off way too early, but I didn’t spin, and recorded a Personal Best and got under 60 seconds with a 59.34. Brad though did a brilliant 58.70 sec run which put him in the lead. For the Leaders Championship, each timed run is a round of the championship, so I got 6 points for second place which meant I gained one point as I could drop a 5 point score.
On the second timed run, I managed to man up properly and didn’t slow up too much at the end of the straight and recorded another Personal Best, a 58.64 second run, and Brad didn’t improve. This meant I had won the class by 0.06 secs and scored 9 points for the leaders championship. Result
So after the year I managed to win the class for Up to 1400cc Modified Series Production Cars and finished Equal 4th overall in the Championship – not too bad for my first go.

My last event of the year was the H.S.A. Sprint at Curborough. Again an event I’ve been secretary for the previous number of years, so it was nice to take part again as a driver. Three in the class this time. me and my friends, Wil Ker and Ben Hamer in their 998cc Turbo Mini. Wil and Ben normally drive an OMS single seater but were using their Mini as the OMS had dropped valve a month ago.
After the first practice runs the Mini was not happy and had blown its head gasket. I then offered either of them a drive in the Imp, and Ben wanted a go. After a chat with the Clerk of the Course and Ben was double driving my car, the first time it’s been double driven.
Practice and Timed runs went well with me setting a Personal Best time of 33.90 and Ben pushing me hard with a 34.64 which shows the car is pretty easy to drive. In total the car did 10 runs on the day and didn’t miss a beat.
Looking back the car has been amazingly reliable, the only run I didn’t complete because of mechanical troubles was when the throttle cable fell off at Prescott. Between events, the only work I have done is to try and improve the car and adjust the clutch. Not bad for a car pushing out nearly 5 times the original 39 hp of the standard Imp.

I fitted Bens Camera to the car at Curbourough and we managed to record a run at last. These were my second practice and Ben first run in the Car

Mine https://youtu.be/--KtiKB1aNo
Bens https://youtu.be/GlfmGt_tV0E

The Tablet comes in very useful for this, A quick guide. down the left is Water Temp, Oil Pressure, Volts and then Revs. Down the right is Air Inlet Temp, Fuel Pressure, Air Fuel Ratio and then Throttle Percentage. In the middle is Boost Pressure and acroos the bottom is Ignition Advance, Speed and then Warm up Percent. Two things I noticed from the video, I need to set the tablet to not Auto rotate, and the clutch switch is too sensitive (the lilic indicator at the bottom left of the screen).

Cheers

Eric
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by bks974c » Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:51 pm

Well done on the class win. I'm sure you'll do even better overall next year with the lessons learnt this year.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ImpManiac » Mon Oct 23, 2017 5:14 pm

Eric, what a great story! :D Congratulations on your and the car's performance! Superb - and well deserved! I'm so pleased for you! 8)

You should serialise your write ups and get Grahame to publish them in Impressions. I'd read them all over again. :wink:

IM 8)
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:08 pm

ImpManiac wrote:Eric, what a great story! :D Congratulations on your and the car's performance! Superb - and well deserved! I'm so pleased for you! 8)

You should serialise your write ups and get Grahame to publish them in Impressions. I'd read them all over again. :wink:

IM 8)
2nd'd.

And paper PRINT is so much more of a permanent record than any virtual forum given the loss of stuff that happens from time to time ...and it can be a lot more accessible too! :) Clan004
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Tue May 01, 2018 9:55 pm

New Season 2018

As the car was running fine when the season finished last year, I haven’t really done much to it over the winter. I’ve fitted a camera, just a cheap 4k Go-Pro Chinese copy. I have also added 2 pressure sensors on the brake lines, one for the front and one for the rear circuit. I felt I’m data logging all the engine parameters, but nothing else apart from speed. I also found it difficult to know where the brake balance was, as once you have turned the knob a whole revolution you have lost the reference point.
It was a bit of a job to sort out the sensors, as if you look for 100 bar 0-5v pressure sensors they are pretty expensive, but with the aid of google, I managed to find out that an Audi A2 has two fitted to the master cylinder. On to ebay, and a master cylinder was bought for £24 complete with the 2 sensors and their plugs. I made an aluminium block up which allowed me to plumb in the sensors and then wired them up to the ECU. Unfortunately then I found out the Megasquirt MS3X I am using only has 3 off 0-5v inputs, and as I was using 2 of them for oil and fuel pressure, it left me one short. I quick e-mail to Phil at ExtraEfi (who supplied the ECU), and it was discovered that there are others I could use but would require diving into the black box and a bit of soldering and some extra components.
With trepidation I floundered may way into the ecu, carefully soldered in these items on the provided ‘prototype area’ on the main board, and added some internal jumper wires. Once all assembled and connected back up, surprise no.1, the engine still worked and surprise no.2, the pressure sensors worked and I had a display of front and rear brake pressures on my tablet dashboard. – result.

The other job carried out was to fit a new clutch driven plate. The organic plate I use wear quite quickly so I have to shim it regularly to have the correct grip. The one that was in had gone down from 6.8mm to start with, to 5.2mm when removed (with 2 re-shims in between ) so it was time for a new one. I have found a place that re-lines them, and had 2 done ready. These though were 8mm thick so needed a lot of shims to move the clutch cover to the correct position. I should get a lot of use out of these.

Anyway, first event of the year arrived I am competing in the same championship this year as last year, the British Hillclimb Leaders Championship. It’s a bit of a strange championship, but think of it as the British Hillclimb Championship for the Classes. The Main British Hillclimb Championship has no class structure, effectively it for the fastest cars. Mainly up to 4 litre single seaters which are capable of over 160 mph at some venues, these compete to qualify for a top 12 run-off after each round with the top ten gaining points. The Leaders championship (that I compete in) is for all the cars in their various classes, from road legal cars, up to the big single seaters. I compete in the upto 1400cc (998 x 1.4 for turbo = 1397) Modified Series Production Cars.

Event 1 – Prescott 28/29 April

I arrived at the event at 07:30 with it lightly raining and the camping field and trailer field a complete muddy mess. Unloaded the car of the trailer and parked the tow car and trailer in a muddy field knowing I would need to be pulled out.
Track was soaking wet, put the cut slicks on and lined up for first practice. Car running sweetly and all seemed fine. My turn to go, tried spinning the wheels in the warm up area, but I couldn’t. The engine didn’t seem right and I had to rev it and slip the clutch just to get to the start line. Light goes green and off I go, well not really off, more stutter, clutch slip, nearly stall, stutter, clutch slip, nearly stall and eventually pull away. Engine would just not pull any load. Stuttered my way up the hill, in a pathetic time and made it back to the paddock. I then sat in the car trying to work out what was wrong. If I reved the engine it just didn’t like it. After looking at the Tablet with the engine readouts on, I then noticed that the inlet vacuum/boost readout wasn’t changing. That’s not right, so checked the manifold pressure pipe going into the ECU. That was fine. I got out of the car and went round the back where I have a bulkhead connector which connects the Manifold Air Pressure pipe, and the two boost pipes for the boost solenoid fitted inside the car. Those three hoses were not connected – bother. Looks like when I refitted the engine I forgot to connect those. Operator Error. Connected them back up and the engine ran as usual. Not much lost wet first practice doesn’t teach you too much.

On to the second practice, still very wet. Because it was so wet and we were parked on grass, I decided to do a bit of tyre warming before the start line. This is better, engine felt brilliant , wheels spinning with ease. Rolled up to the start line, to see the Start Marshal furiously giving the cut engine signal. I cut the engine, to then see a cloud of smoke roll past me, and engulf me and the clerk of the course appearing through the smoke at my passenger side window. This doesn’t seem good. Anyway I was rolled back out of the way, and eventually got the car back into the Paddock where I could look at it.
There were no external signs of a problem, no oil or water dripping, all the internal engine parts still in there, so I assumed it was my turbo scavenge pump that had failed. Because the turbo is at the same level as the sump, I have an electric pump which scavenges the oil out of the turbo and pumps it back into the engine. If this fails, oil gets in the hot exhaust and lets the smoke out. After checking this out and discovering it was still pumping, I decided to see if I could start the engine. A couple of turns on the starter and you could sense something wasn’t right, and it wasn’t starting. Then I noticed the stream of water coming out of the exhaust pipe – that’s not good. Game over for the day, so I packed up and went home, after extracting the tow car from the quagmire.
On Sunday I unloaded the car and took the engine out to assess the damage. As I was removing the engine I noticed that I had committed Operator Error No.2. When reconnecting the boost pipes, I had accidentally connected one of them, instead of to the bulkhead connector, to the rivnut I had fitted to hold the block on. This meant that the turbo boost was uncontrolled. I checked out the datalog and my fears were confirmed, the boost had hit 23 PSI. Normally in first gear I have about 10 PSI of boost and in other gears about 16 PSI. It looks like this is my boost limit.
Once the engine was stripped down and the head taken off it was quite obvious what had happened. The wills rings, which aren’t in grooves in the head, instead are held in position by a spacer plate, had moved. On cylinder 3, the wills ring had actually bend into the cylinder allowing the water to get into the cylinder. On other cylinders the ring had gone egg shaped where the spacer plate had given way next to the slots for the water to flow between head and block. That’s not too bad, new spacer plate ( I had a few cut ) and wills rings and I should be back in business. Unfortunately on closer inspection I found a crack in number two cylinder liner. New bottom end to be built for the next event then. Luckily over the winter I have been sorting out the parts to put another two bottom-ends together.
Not the best start to the season, but I was sort of expecting it considering how trouble free last year was. The engine has been together since 2011 (as a turbo engine), and before that was my road imps 998 bottom end. The block is still okay just needs new liners.

I have pictures of the damage, but i'm not sure how to post after the Photobucket fun.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by colimp66 » Tue May 01, 2018 10:29 pm

Eric,
Great write up of the preparation and your first event of the year. Sorry to hear it didn't go as planned.
Hope all goes well for the next one good luck at the event.
Look forward to reading about it.
Cheers
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by bks974c » Wed May 02, 2018 9:27 am

Sounds like a trip to Specsavers should be on the list. :shock:

Sorry to hear you had problems but I'm sure Pimp2 will come back stronger and quicker for the next round.

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Wed May 02, 2018 9:53 am

Eric you can upload pictures to Microsoft's OneDrive (1Drive). There is a menu option on 1Drv to generate Image code to paste into the post on here between [Img] tags.

A bit of a faff but it would be nice to see your bent WRs!

Maybe you should uprate the WR spacer plate design to take 20 psi boost now you know it takes as much as 23 psi to break it! That is, if the liners can take it too!

So how many miles had the bottom end done in the road car before you raced it?
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Tue May 08, 2018 10:11 pm

Thanks for the tip on posting Photo's Lotus-e-Clan, I think I have sorted it.

The engine was my first ever Imp engine, did about 50,000 miles as an 875, probably the same again as a 998. It was originally converted to 998 by John Lockwood at Suisse Auto, after a stromberg throttle plate screw came loose and wrecked a bore.

Sorry for the delay I've been busy building an engine.

Anyway damage to wills rings and decompression plate. I use an alloy plate 1.4mm thick with paper gaskets either side making a total thickness of 1.8mm, that supports the wills rings and lowers the compression. There are no grooves in the head or block. This is what the 23 PSI did. You can see the wills ring actually moved inwards. On the other cylinder you can see the alloy plate has bent where the waterway cutout is.

Image

This is the crack in the cylinder liner

Image

So new bottom end needs to be sorted. Over the winter I had sorted out 2 bottom ends, A new one and a used one. The new one consisting of a block sorted about 5 years ago at Rodwell Motorsport, std 998cc wet liner one. I have lightened & balanced a set of rods and bought a set Maynards new pistons. The crank again is a good std used one with new mains, big end bearings and some Corley Conversions rod bolts. I have fitted my own 10mm thick alloy block strengthening plate, my own blocks down to the caps and tapped and fitted M12 studs. Large oil pump, my own baffle system and std sump.
The used one is my old N/a engine from the Clan. This was stripped and the same mods done as to the new one.
I decided to use the used one as it has already run the rings in the bores so it won't need any 'running in' as it won't be getting any.

This weekend I've been building up this engine, fitting the original head and cam and stuffing it all back in the Imp. One improvement is to have some new stronger decompression plates made, this time in Stainless and with holes for water transfer instead of slots. Impressed with the service from Accurate Laser in Tividale who made these in 3 days.

Image

Fitted

Image

Anyway all back together, not run it yet, but hopefully it should be okay.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Wed May 09, 2018 7:02 am

Not sure how to do the maths, but that 23 psi boost must be more like 230 psi compression pressure accounting for a 10.1 CR ...and then there's the explosive pressure of combustion ... whatever it is .. it's a lot of pressure!

Oil in the BE bearings must be pretty squished-out too. Do the bearings suffer at all ? What have you set your oil PRV to? 80 psi or more?

Good thinking with the water holes .. natural re-inforcement.
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by ImpManiac » Sun May 27, 2018 5:38 pm

Sorry to hear about the teething issues in your first event, Eric. It does seem that you have got to the root causes of them, though, and are well on the way to sorting them. :mrgreen:

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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Tue Sep 18, 2018 7:45 pm

Again sorry for the lack of updates, as you will see I’ve been busy. I did type this out once, then lost it when something went wrong with the preview.

After building up the new ‘old’ engine for the car, I went to my next event which was at Harewood, 2 weeks after letting the steam out of the original one. Engine started and ran fine and I lined up for 1st practice, looking forward to abusing the car again. Car ran fine and all seemed good, with my time being what I expected, bearing in mind I haven’t run the car properly since October.
Practice 2 seemed okay as well, but going over the finish line, the oil pressure light came on, and I saw 8 PSI on the digital gauge on my tablet, as I coasted back to my paddock position. That’s not good. The engine seemed to run okay and the water temp was around 90 degrees and the oil temp 100 degrees. Not sure what was going on but everything I could check was looking okay so I decided to have my third practice run. This was a mistake, the engine was definitely not running at 100%, you could feel it straining up the straight, I only just got into 4th gear where before I was well into 4th before the final bend. Looking in the rear view mirror, as I left the last corner, you could see smoke and as I lifted off over the line, the oil pressure dropped to 1 PSI. - bother. I coasted back to my paddock place with the engine knocking and the oil pressure refusing to rise. Oh well, early finish again, I’ll not be here for the second day, time to stick the car on the trailer and drag it home.
Well I had a free Sunday, as I should have been competing, so I took the engine out of the Imp and stripped it down. Once the sump was off, it was quite obvious where the problem lay - spun no.4 big end and not much of the flywheel end main bearing left, most of it was around the oil pump strainer. I’m glad I called it a day when I did; it was only a few revs away from the conrod welding itself to the crank and releasing chunks of metal into the outside world. The conrod bolts on no. 4 were a nice shade of purple. So new conrod and bolts, new crank and new bearings required. Unfortunately with the flywheel end main bearing trashed, the crank was able to flail around and the bore the scroll runs in got very badly scored. This meant it wasn’t a quick fix, definitely repairable but not in a week, so time for engine number 3.

Image

Image

As mentioned in the last instalment, I had a bottom end ready, but in pieces, to build another engine. I wasn’t sure what caused the problems in the previous engine, so I built this exactly the same except this was a fresh block and new pistons. I got it all together and running within a weekend and it fired up and ran perfectly. My next event was Gurston Down, the following weekend. Due to the previous problems I decided to test the car to see if it was all okay. The one big downside of a Mod Prod car is that it is not road legal (slicks, no lights, horn, handbrake etc) so I couldn’t just take it out for a test drive. A couple of years ago at the Autosport Show I noticed a stand run by Bruntingthorpe Proving Ground, an ex RAF and American Air Force airfield with a 2 mile long (ish) runway. This is 4 miles from me and talking to them, they said I could book testing with them for £50 hour. Well I rang up and they were really friendly and helpful, but there were a few problems. If I wanted to use the track, I would need Indemnity Insurance, but If I wanted to use some large hardstanding areas, I didn’t need it as I would be on my own. Great, book me in for the Tuesday, is it still £50 an hour. They said it was, but, minimum 2 hours and + Vat. So I went for it.
I turned up on the Tuesday and was to wait for the airfield car to take me to my area. He arrived but said they had a better area, and told me to follow him. After going past 10000 of ex lease cars parked on every single bit of unused hardstanding we eventually arrived in the middle of the huge runway. This had been split in half, both longways and crossways, to allow two separate tracks to operate, and two leave two other 1 miles straights. I could use one of these which had been marked out like one carriageway of a motorway, used to help train the emergency services. So, for the next 2 hours I had the use of my own empty motorway.
I started out gently driving up and down the motorway for about 15 minutes, until the water and oil temps got too high. The car is designed for short bursts, so it will get too hot if used continuously. I let it cool down for 10 minutes and went out again. I can run the electric water pump and fan off a slave battery without running the engine to cool it down. After a couple of times doing this, I could see at the end of each session, the oil pressure at tickover was dropping gradually, and by my 5th set of running up and down the pressure had dropped to 12 PSI at tickover, well down from the 28 at the start when hot. bother again. Time to pack up, take the car home, cancel the upcoming events, and have a beer. I had entered Gurston, Shelsley Walsh and Loton Park on successive weekends, after which there was a small gap to the next event at Doune. I cancelled all but Doune, hoping to sort it out by then. This gave my just over a month to sort the problem out.
I stripped this engine down at the weekend, to discover similar problems to the previous engine. Not so bad this time but it would have got worse if I carried on. What was going on ?. On this engine you could see score marks in the crank and no.3 main bearing, 1/3 had collapsed but the remaining portion was badly scored. Looks like oil contamination damaging the bearings. After a think, the one thing that linked these two engines, was that both had been Aquablasted. This is a method of cleaning aluminium using glass beads and hot water blasting. I had done one block myself and the other had been done by the machinist. After talking to Andy Jones and a few engine builders, I came to the conclusion that basically I hadn’t cleaned the oil galleries properly and some stray glass beads had made their way to the bearings. Modern high performance bearings have only a very thin layer of white metal to absorb dirt, and these beads would embed themselves in this, but not deep enough, and destroy the crank surface. Okay I had knackered 2 cranks and bearings but at least it wasn’t a fundamental engine problem, just my bad assembly practice. I’ve learnt something.
What do I do now, I had three knackered 998 engines, how best to proceed? I decided to rebuild the third engine, clean all the oil galleries properly and put it back together with new a crank and bearings.
With the flywheel end main bearing trashed, the crank was able to flail around again and the bore the scroll runs in was scored, not as bad as the second engine but not good. I decided to do a bit of an emergency repair. I took the crank that was damaged and filled the scroll grooves with JB weld (metal filled epoxy). When set, I sanded it down to leave a smooth diameter with no grooves. I then carefully wrapped this diameter with a single layer of brown parcel tape. On the block, I cleaned up the scroll area with coarse emery, both on the block and the cap. I then smeared JB weld on the surfaces and assembled it all together with the crank and good bearings, to effectively ‘cast’ a new surface. When set, I removed everything and cleaned up any excess epoxy. This gave me a new surface with a slight running clearance (the thickness of the parcel tape) to which I could use a replacement crank. It was worth a try ,as if it did leak a bit, the engine doesn’t do many miles.
The oil galleries were rodded out about 10 times each, the threads that the gallery bungs are fitted were also cleaned with a tap to ensure no glass beads were caught (top tip from Andy Jones), and the galleries cleaned again. The engine was reassembled with new crank (well, good used unground standard crank) and new bearings. I also fitted a new oil cooler/heater (water cooled one off a VW Golf) to ensure there was no crap in the oil system.
The engine was refitted to the car and it started up instantly and ran beautifully. Fuel injection is sooo good. Right, time to enter an event with, hopefully, a working engine.
The next event in my championship (British Hillclimb Leaders Championship) was at Doune, nr Stirling in Scotland, a mere 6 hour drive away. Do I risk it with an untested engine, of course I do, I’m pretty sure I solved the problem so why not.

Image

The car behaved itself all day during Saturday practice, the engine running fine, with good oil pressure at the end of my runs. I was looking at the oil pressure readout as I crossed the finish line each time, checking that, before I even looked for my time on the readout in the top paddock. I wasn’t trying particularly hard, I was more interested how the engine performed. The normal ‘launch controlled’ starts didn’t seem to be working well, the engine was bogging down after I released the clutch. I put this down to the new clutch plate I had fitted, maybe it’s a bit more fierce. The engine seemed good, it just didn’t seem to have the grunt coming out of corners as the old one. It seemed fine once it was up and away, just seemed slightly lacking low down. Maybe the cam or ignition wasn’t timed exactly as before. Anyway the car was running and I was starting to get used to the car again.
This event was Doune’s 50th anniversary meeting and the organisers put a Hog Roast on the Saturday evening – which was great to catch up will people and talk rubbish most of the night.
Sunday was another splendid summer’s day and 1st practice went well with my time coming down as I got more used to the grip slicks give. Oil pressure still perfect – looked like I might actually complete my first timed run of the year. Time for my first timed run, and the car wouldn’t run without the slave battery being connected. Great, runs fine until you need it. After plenty of panicking and great help from fellow competitors, I traced the fault to my battery cut-off relay. Instead of the usual big red cut off switch, I had fitted a 100a relay that latched when switched on, and released when either of the cutoff switches were pressed. This has worked perfectly until now. It looks as though the contacts had gone dirty. A quick short across them with a spanner, cleaned them up, and the car fired up and ran fine. Whilst sorting this out, an unfortunate competitor had clouted the barriers, which gave me time to line up in the correct starting order.
First timed run went fine, not as fast as I hoped, but okay, and my second was even better, but still 1.5 seconds off my personal best from last year. I ended up 2nd in class (out of 3) being beaten by Gavin Neate in his 1400cc Pug 106. I actually got a decent start on my last run by disconnecting the launch control (managed to pull the wire off the clutch pedal switch with my foot) on the way to the start line. Anyway a great weekends competition, car running well and really enjoyed getting back driving it again, even if Doune still scares me.

I've got more events to right up - back soon

Eric
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by Lotus-e-Clan » Tue Sep 18, 2018 9:16 pm

Brillant writeup Eric. I love the technical detail ..so much to learn. Pleased to see your design for sump baffle within a std sized sump is along the same design philosophy as mine ....only yours is better executed. :D

Just thinking how much more costly it would have been if you weren't using more or less std cranks (say bigger strokes or knife-edging). The cleaning thing is a joke ...you get it cleaned so it''ll be more reliable only to find the cleaning made it less reliable. A clean with a rag dipped in white spirits would have served you better!

I'd be a bit cross with the cleaning people!

Keep the updates coming. Clan004
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:13 pm

My season has now started ( a bit late :oops: :oops: )

A fortnight after Doune I had a two events over a weekend, one at Barbon Manor (in Cumbria) on the Saturday and then over the hills to Harewood near Leeds on the Sunday. I competed at Barbon, for the first time, a couple of years ago, and it rained solidly all day. Last year’s event was cancelled because of a waterlogged paddock, so it was great to turn up this time in beautiful sunshine, with a dry weekend forecast.
Barbon is a simple, narrow course, and my first runs seemed pretty good, leading the class (of 2) after the second practice run. Things didn’t go too well on the third, I spun on the first corner. I basically lost the back end as I lifted off too late into the corner. The car spun so quickly, there was no chance of catching it, so I let it spin. Unfortunately the Armco is about a foot away from the outside of the 9 foot wide track, and with a nearly 12 foot car, it was pretty hard to miss it. I did pretty well with the rear of the car gently hitting the Armco whilst spinning, cracking the o.s.r. lower quarter panel, breaking 3 of the rear lights, and then the n,s,f, corner tapping the Armco as the car was going backwards. A drive back down the track past the start was the final embarrassing part. :oops: :oops:
Back in my paddock space, a quick check over of the car and I had pretty much got away with it. A few bits of tape to repair the 2” crack in the rear quarter panel, and removing the last remaining rear light saw me ready to go again.
After lunch, timed runs started and me and my class rival, Gavin Neate in his 1400cc Peugeot 106, both set times below the class hill record. This had been set by Andrew Russell in his 1140cc imp powered Ginetta G15 a few years ago and Gavin lowered it to 28.14 with me setting a 28.61. I was, naturally a bit wary into the first corner so I knew the time could be improved. On the second runs, I managed to get the first corner correct and posted a 28.13 second run and Gavin set a slightly slower run of 28.26. This meant I had won the class, and set the new class record, by a mere 1 hundredth of a second. :shock: 8) A brilliant result, on a superb day of hill climbing. The Barbon Hill, it may be short and only used twice a year, but it great fun to drive and a superb challenge.

A nice evening drive over the hills to Harewood, where I left the car in the paddock and carried on to my friends house near York for the evening. Arrived there and went straight round to his neighbours for a BBQ and a few beers – proper Yorkshire hospitality.
The Sunday at Harewood was slightly disappointing for me. I couldn’t get within a second of my previous best time there, the car not seeming as fast as before. It still can’t use launch control, and it doesn’t seem to have the pull out of the corners it used to have. My speed trap speeds were slightly down as well. At Barbon I had nothing to compare to, but at I have competed at Harewood a few times in the car, and it never feels good to go slower in good conditions. What made it worse was Gavin in the Pug, took my class record off me as well. Ah well you can’t win them all, and I decided that the car could do with a tuning session on the rollers to set this engine up properly.
I managed to get a tuning session booked for the car, unfortunately it would be after my next event, which wasn’t until mid August. This meant I had a bit of a break from competing, which was good, as I was part of the team for this years National at Prestwold Park. This would give me time to organise the Autotest and help out with all the other things that are required to run a national.

More to come
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Re: Pimp2 - the rebuild starts

Post by pimpdriver » Mon Dec 10, 2018 7:43 pm

End of season update, sorry for the lateness, must try harder. :oops: :oops:

Well the season finished a lot better than it started.

Curborough – RSSOC Sprint (Scimitar Club).

This was a similar event to last year, not in my main championship but one I enjoy. Run on the Figure of 8 course this is a Classic Car biased event with me in a class of 2 with the other car retiring after the first practice with major brake problems. I won my class :D but set a personal best of 63.80 secs, which is only 0.15 secs off my normal class record of 63.65. This being despite the fact that my finishing speeds were down to 88 mph where last year they were 95 – 96 mph. I must be driving the car better as I knocked of 0.8 secs with the engine not going as well. I did set the 3rd fastest time of the day and beat all the Ferraris :-).

Engine Upgrade.

Early on in the year I had talked to Mark Maynard about some new pistons to put in one of the engines I was putting together and they are now in the engine that is fitted. I also talked to him about getting a spare R20 cam to build up a complete spare engine. Mark suggested that their cam supplier (Newman Cams) could do me a special Turbo cam based on the R20 to improve the performance. I went for this (no-brainer as they did it for the same price as an R20) and picked it up from Mark at the National.
After Doune, I had decided to book the car in for a tuning session to try and sort out the lack luster engine. I couldn’t get it booked in at Bailey Performance until late August. This ended up being the Tuesday after Curborough, with me having to drive down to Gurston Down for an event on the Friday.
I took Monday off work and decided to fit the new cam. It seemed sensible to fit it for the tuning session, as I had it and wouldn’t know how it worked until I tried it. I had to modify a used cam carrier to fit it. The Turbo cam has a lift of .380” (inlet only) so a little more than usual needed removing from the sides of the holes on the carrier for it to fit. I also found I good used set of tappets which I carefully lapped flat for the new cam. Fitting went well, got it all shimmed and timed in when I managed to drop one of the screws that locks the two piece sprocket together down the timing case – bother. You could hear it drop in slow-motion, and rattle its way out of sight. After checking one of the remaining screws was magnetic, I started on a 10 minute fishing expedition with a magnet on a stick. Eventually, after bending the end of the stick over at 45 degrees I heard a click from the bowels of the engine and triumphantly withdrew the magnet with a screw on the end – phew. The rest of the assembly went well and after adding a bottle of ZDDP to the oil to help the cam, I started it all up. I ran it at 3000 revs for about 25mins (sorry neighbours) whilst I cleared up. A quick check over and all was ready for the trip to Broseley (nr Telford) for the rolling road session the next day.
I arrived at Bailey Performance the next day and straight away got the car off the trailer and in to Dale’s workshop. The car was driven onto the rollers and strapped down. This was a bit tricky as I have lowered the car since it was originally on the rollers, and the sump was gently sitting on the floor behind the rollers. The tyres were pumped up to 40PSI to help raise the car up and there was clearance, a fag papers worth, but clearance. As usual the engine fired up instantly and warmed up with needing to touch anything. Dale the set about the tuning, first setting the car up as normally aspirated with the turbo waste-gate held open. This immediately showed that it could handle a lot more fuel and timing in the mid-range. After about 2 hour of tuning, with the car being rested a few times to let the oil cool down, the waste-gate was put back under control of the ecu. Again after about 2 hours of hard running the car was set up perfectly with probably about 15 full power runs to fine tune the timing and boost control.
And the end of all this I had less ultimate power than before, we recorded just over 200hp previously, with a peak of 185 hp now. You can hardly call it a peak though, as the power was a virtual flat line from about 5000 rpm up to 8500 rpm. The mid-range was much improved, with power starting earlier and smoother. This is exactly what I wanted, should make the car easier to drive and less chance of being ‘off cam’ coming out of corners. In hill-climbing, it is much better to sacrifice a few top end hp for better low down pull out of the corners.

Gurston Down

I like the hill at Gurston, fast and scary. The Saturday practice day saw me competing with 2 Minis, a Citroen Ax, and Ginetta G15. The day was nice a sunny with me getting very close to the record holders mini times and the car behaving perfectly. The launch control works properly again with starts in the 2.15 secs area, and top speeds over 90 mph into hollow and over 95 over the line. Through the tight Karousel section I could keep the car in second gear (normally use first) and pulling out of the last corner (Ashes), the car pulled superbly with a bit of power oversteer. New cam seems to be working great. I was really happy with the way the car went, and how I was driving, considering I haven’t been here since last April.
Unfortunately the Sunday started off drizzling and the rain just got worse. The morning practice run was damp, and the first timed run was very wet with streams starting to form across the track. After the first timed run I was leading the class by a few tenths, but then the weather got even worse and the meeting was abandoned before everybody had done a timed run. After a very soggy packing up (tow car parked 250 yards from the Imp) the trip home was difficult as well with the narrow lanes in the South Downs being pretty flooded.

Prescott

This event was the next weekend, making 3 weekend in a row. I really like Prescott, a brilliant setting, a technical track with all sorts of different challenges. Practice went well (much better than the first meeting here earlier in the year!!) and was leading the class by over a second and a half. A slightly smaller class this event, with Andrew Russells G15, Gavin Neates Pug 106 and Julian Harbers Mini. Unfortunately Ryan Earmer in his Metro had destroyed his engine competing in France and had to cancel his entry.
On the Sunday, the day dawned with fine dry weather so it looked like it was going to a great day of hillclimbing . We only get two timed runs today with no practice run early on, this meant I took it a bit carefully on my first run but still almost matched my time from Saturday. For my second timed run I really went for it and braked a little bit later, accelerated a bit earlier and it felt like I had really strung a great run together. As I went past the timing clock on the way back down the return road, I saw a 47.17 sec run. This was nearly a second quicker than my first run and a personal best. After the time was confirmed on the timing sheets, I had also broken the record for the class, which was set in 2013 by a 16v Mini, by exactly half a second. This has been a record I’ve been after, I got within 0.1 of a second last year, so it was great to now take it. Again this is a class for any Modified Saloon Car under 1400cc, and to take it in a self-developed 50 year old car, with the engine in the ‘wrong place’ and swing axle suspension feels even better.

Loton Park

The last meeting of the year in the Leaders Championship was a bit of a damp event with our class never really getting a dry run. Loton is a bit of a bogey track for me, love the place but I never seem to go too well here. I’m usually pretty good in the wet but I couldn’t match Gavin in his Pug 106 all weekend. Anyway had fun, didn’t bend it (apart from the front spoiler which I ripped off on a grassy lump in the paddock) and we all had a good drink and meal in the village hall nearby on the Saturday night.
I ended up 3rd (last) in class in the Leaders Championship this year because I didn’t complete enough events. Gavin Neate in his Peugeot 106 won the class with the Imp powered Ginetta G15 of Andrew Russell coming second. Gavin was 4th overall after a superb season and was running second in July, when the top 3 of the championship qualified to compete in the European Hillclimb Masters in Italy. Unfortunately the Masters is held every 2 years and I would have qualified last year, if it was held.

Curborough HSA Sprint (fig 8 Sat, 1 lap Sun)

To finish off the season I competed in the HSA Sprints at Curbs in mid-October. The fig 8 course on the Saturday started off wet and dried out for the afternoon. I was in a class of my own as my fellow competitors (and good friends) in their Turbo Mini broke down again like last year.
The Sunday was the Single lap course, and started off wet and got wetter. I was in a class of 4 this time, up against a Clio, a Porsche 911 and a twin turbo 2.9 Cosworth powered Reliant Scimitar. I managed to lead the class through all runs and emerge the class winner, in the oldest and smallest car, nice finish to the season even though I was soaked through.

After 2 proper years competing with the car I now have or have held the following Class Records for Modified Production Saloon Cars under 1400cc

Prescott – 47.17 secs
Shelsley Walsh – 32.67secs
Barbon Manor - 28.13 secs
Harewood – 64.52 secs
Doune – 50.26 secs

Also the following Personal Best times at the following tracks
Curborough Fig 8 - 63.80 secs (Record 63.65)
Curborough 1 Lap – 33.90 secs (Record 33.15)
Loton Park – 58.64 - secs (Record 57.52)
Gurston Down – 35.92 - secs (Record 35.14)

Cheers
Eric
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Eric Morrey

Rawlson Imp Turbo
'Irish' Clan
Rover 75 waft-mobile
Hillclimb Clan - Resting
Reliant Scimitar GTE se5a - Resting
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